Kate V Robertson : Object(hood)

In the last two decades there has been a breakdown of the traditional distinction between a subject and an object, with an increasing focus on the ‘thing’ as a mediator in both human and non-human relationships. In this ambitious exhibition by Kate V Robertson, this contemporary way of thinking is manifested by a large sculptural cabinet that emanates moving-images and spoken word derived from eight unique things from the University of Edinburgh’s collections. Also including creative written responses, Object(hood) echoes encounters between these things and writers, academics and the artist, allowing fascinating historical artefacts to physically connect with the ripples of meaning they have engendered.

Featuring one object each week, the exhibition will reinvent itself around the history and innate properties of the selected things. They include: a brain coral, a Gandharan sculpture fragment, a large mannequin head cast by Eduardo Paolozzi, an anatomical eye model, a Bersag Horn, a large conch trumpet, the figure of Mercury and a death mask of Isaac Newton.

Click here to see the different objects as they appear in collections – updated weekly.

Kate V Robertson gained an undergraduate degree and Masters of Fine Art from Glasgow School of Art. She has exhibited nationally and Internationally, including exhibitions for Glasgow International, BALTIC 39, Eastside Projects and David Dale Gallery. International exhibitions include venues in

New York, Berlin, Nice, Frankfurt and Lausanne.

Robertson lives in Glasgow, is a member and director of Glasgow Sculpture Studios and is represented by Patricia Fleming Projects.

11 February – 8 April 2017
Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh

Stuart Fallon : Between poles and tides

New Acquisitions from the University of Edinburgh Art Collection
David Batchelor, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Ilana Halperin, Jessica Harrison, Fabienne Hess, Daniel Hughes, Daisy Lafarge, Jonathan Owen, Katie Paterson, Isobel Turley, Luc Tuymans, JL Williams

Including three tattooed Doulton figurines, a set of clocks that tell the time of every planet in the solar system, a sculpture created over ten months in a French cave and a large gazing leopard projected over the main Gallery space, Between poles and tides is a dramatic display of work recently acquired by the University of Edinburgh. It features work by established artists, recent graduates and works connected to the Talbot Rice Gallery programme.

Actively building its contemporary art collection since 2012, the University of Edinburgh has been strategically acquiring works that reflect and feed the breadth and depth of its teaching, learning and academic community. Ensuring public access to this collection, Between poles and tides demonstrates the quality and diversity of these new acquisitions. Formally and conceptually dynamic, the exhibition includes sculpture, painting, printmaking, video and poetry; whilst exploring ecology, cosmology, politics and geology. Reflecting a cross-section of contemporary artistic practice, it includes works concerned with appropriation, materiality and the act of collecting itself.

11 February – 6 May 2017
Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh

Paul Nesbitt : 30 years of exhibitions at Inverleith House

Inverleith House is currently closed to the public. PLEASE ENSURE IT RE-OPENS TO SHOW GREAT CONTEMPORARY ART !!!

Inverleith House was designed in 1773 by David Henderson and built for Sir James Rocheid (1715-1787) as his family home and centre piece of his estate in 1774 at a total cost of £4,109. Around 1820 a part of the Inverleith estate was sold to become the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). The house was gifted to the Crown in 1877 together with the surrounding land for the purpose of extending the activities of RBGE and for the enjoyment of the public. After restoration work following a fire, Inverleith House became the official residence of the Regius Keeper (director) of RBGE. From 1960 it housed the new Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, which in 1984 moved to the building of the former John Watson’s Institution in west Edinburgh. On 4 December 1970 the house was listed as a historic building. Since 1986 Inverleith House has been used as an exhibition space by RBGE.

Vukasin Nedeljković : Asylum Archive

As Asylum seekers are increasingly under threat we show this from Art in Ireland TV.

Garter Lane Arts Centre is delighted to present Asylum Archive, an exhibition of photography, artefacts and found objects created by visual artist and researcher Vukasin Nedeljković. Asylum Archive is directly concerned with the everyday realities of asylum seekers in Ireland, drawing on Nedeljković’s personal experience of being an asylum seeker and living in direct provision centres throughout Ireland.

Thu 9 Feb – Sat 8 Apr
Garter Lane Arts Centre, Waterford

Craft Scotland in partnership with Visual Arts Scotland : Fly 2016

The Royal Scottish Academy Building, The Mound, Edinburgh

3 – 27 December 2016

Visual Arts Scotland held their annual exhibition, FLY, launching on Saturday 3 December in the stunning upper galleries of the The Royal Scottish Academy Building on the Mound in Edinburgh. For 2016/17 they formed new exciting partnership with Craft Scotland, strengthened existing relationships with the art colleges, and as always extended an open invitation to all practicing artists – emerging and established, applied and fine artists, working in large scale or small, to demonstrate the level of talent out there via their open submission.

VAS were delighted to be partnering with Craft Scotland to bring together the first in a planned series of media specific showcases over the next few years to shine a spotlight on a different craft discipline each year.

VAS and Craft Scotland celebrate a mutual ambition to exhibit quality craft in a venue fitting of its stature, and in context alongside works of fine art.

Emma Lucy O’Brien : The Reading Room

We have created a Reading Room between the season’s exhibitions, as a space to sit and read, think or respond to some of the different ways that we portray and remember war. As well as books, games and material to stimulate your thinking, the room will also host reading groups, lectures, debates and space for you to have your say. Coordinated in collaboration with Carlow Library Services and Carlow College. Visitors will find contributions from, Carlow County Library, Carlow College Library, Carlow Military Museum, Hughie O’Donoghue, Brian Hand, Blaise Smith, Helen Maher, Carlow College, Dr. Richard Mc Mahon, Trinity College Dublin, Elaine Callinan, Carlow College, the RTE News Room, and 11 Bit Studio.

01 November – 30 January
Visual Carlow, Carlow

Ann Mulrooney : Diary

Tim Hetherington was a photojournalist, filmmaker, human rights advocate and artist, best known for his coverage of conflict in areas including Liberia, Afghanistan and Libya where he was killed in a mortar attack in April 2011. ‘Diary’, made in collaboration with Magali Charrier, is an experimental non-narrative film that powerfully communicates his subjective experience and the duality of his existence between life in the West and life in conflict zones. It is accompanied by images from his time in Afghanistan in 2007-2008 documenting the American campaign in the Korengal Valley. Delving beneath the ‘hardware’ of war to capture the humanity and vulnerability of the soldiers, this work received the World Press Photo of the Year in 2007 and led to the making of the documentary film Restrepo with Sebastian Junger, which was nominated for an Academy Award in 2010.

31 October – 05 February
Visual Carlow, Carlow

Emma Lucy O’Brien : Red Earth

Reflecting on events, memories and the traces of evidence left to us from times past, O’Donoghue uses his family history to connect with and understand the wars that have shaped our histories; and reflects on the personal experiences of his grandfather Hugh O’Donoghue in the First World War and his father, Daniel O’Donoghue, during the Second World War. From his richly painted surfaces emerge fragments from the archive of his past, entwined with the disturbing resonance of war.

01 November – 29 January, Visual Carlow, Carlow

John Sumpter : Ideas of Beauty

‘Ideas of Beauty’ is an exhibition organised by Edinburgh’s Democratic Camera Club. Beauty is a difficult word for many artists. It is associated with cliché, with the ‘chocolate box’ image. The notion of what is beautiful changes with time, and between different cultures. Taste in beauty is also influenced by social conditioning. Contemporary art sees beauty in ideas as much as the object.
This exhibition invites artists to investigate, subvert and celebrate ‘Ideas of Beauty’ in their own style.
Art works will be for sale.

7 December – 17 December 2016
Venue: Sciennes Gallery, Summerhall

Kjersti Sletteland : Coup de Theatre

Venue: Meadows Gallery, Summerhall

Coup de Théâtre – a group exhibition of contemporary sculpture.
It investigates notions of the unexpected, the sudden and the unpredictable translated through visual, immersive and sensory experiences.
Featuring new work from Hans K Clausen, Clare Flatley, Despina Nissiriou, Paulina Sandberg, Kjersti Sletteland and Chloe Windsor
Preview: Friday 9 Dec, 7pm

Alexander Mackenzie : Invisible

This exhibition is a celebration of that which is just beyond the view of what is seen. It is that emergent presence that sometimes take the form of a still life and sometimes a landscape – an alchemy of colour into form and then gone again.
Alexander Mackenzie is a painter who seeks out the ineffable in thick oily azure blues, terracotta’s and alizarin crimsons, scuffed over with blunt-nosed mushy chalk, in gummy gouaches and in nearly invisible watercolours – and in the pictorial gaps that arise willy nilly in the spaces between.

This Christmas exhibition is an array of large oil paintings, a collection of small moments in time and some bright children’s book illustrations of a big hearted bear – accompanied by the contrapuntal ambience of the homeless depicted in gravestone glass panels placed randomly throughout both exhibition rooms.

3rd December 2016 – 3rd January 2017, Summerhall

Matthew Poland : Meaningful Objects

Fine Roots Gallery at the Forest Café present a group show by Edinburgh-based emerging artists.

The exhibition shows new work by all eight artists, including painting, sculpture, moving image and
performance that form part of the wider practice of the exhibiting artists.

For the exhibition at Fine Roots the group have responded to concerns around materiality and our relationship to things; what it means to belong and what things are required to gain access; and to challenge the good intentions of a deep engagement that may only last a moment. Those exhibiting at Meaningful Objects are interested in ways to return to oneself through the use of personal possessions in the present. The work draws from contemporary concerns of futurity and our post-
internet plugged in selves.

The exhibition comprises of an intricately stitched textile based wall hanging; contemporary painting of acrylic spray paint on canvas; shiny sculptural vacuum formed objects that are raised; screen based moving image work; prints on paper of barren landscape; heavy, textural oil paint on paper, reminiscent of sample materials for kitchens; a gold tinselled screen leading to a series of black and white photographs; and, uncanny casts of often overlooked objects.

A happening will take place at 7.30pm at the opening Friday, 18 November 2016, by the artist Matthew Poland.

Kate Smith : Time is All Around

Working in partnership with St. Columba’s Hospice, Edinburgh Printmakers’ member artists will work closely with staff, families and patients at the facility to explore how we find meaning in our own personal experiences, the love of family and friends, freedom and peace through contemporary art and printmaking practice.

Through a faith-neutral lens, we will explore the ways in which people in palliative care experience the value of life and relationships, and the importance and beauty of the everyday which might be overlooked. We will explore how the tragedy of terminal illness can be accompanied with hope and self-actualisation through acceptance and reconciliation.

St Columba’s Hospice was opened in 1977 in Edinburgh, as Scotland’s first modern hospice. They provide specialist palliative care for patients and support for their loved ones free of charge. They run a world-class education programme training specialist and non-specialist doctors, nurses, healthcare professionals and carers from across Scotland and beyond, in specialist palliative care.

Their aim is to improve the lives of people whose illness cannot be cured, working to allow people to live as actively as possible after diagnosis to the end of their lives, however long that may be. The highest value is put on respect, choice and empowerment.

28 October – 23 December 2016, Edinburgh Printmakers

Ross Fraser Mclean : Ceiba – Casa de Todos los Muertos

Two years in the making, CEIBA – Casa de Todos los Muertos is the result of photographer- artist Ross Fraser McLean’s research trips into Mexican culture, specifically exploring Mexico’s relationship with death and dying. Unlike most other parts of the world, death is embraced as part of life, with families gathering annually to remember their dead during Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead).

McLean’s experience of Day of the Dead inspired him to visit cemeteries and characters affected by death across the country. His images capture moments – sombre and quiet, vibrant and noisy – of everyday life, amplified in contrast by the iconography of death. McLean has also created Altares de Muertos (Altars of the dead), pairing photography with installation and sculpture for the first time in his work. The photographs and objects explore and question the Mexican viewpoint – that death is an equaliser; a reminder that we are all on the same journey.

28th October 2016 – 23rd December 2016, Summerhall
Curated by Holly Knox Yeoman

Rob Kennedy : acts of dis play

29 October – 17 December 2016
Talbot Rice, Edinburgh

Envisioned as an experiential project, acts of dis play aims to undo many aspects of the way our sensible environment is distributed, unsettling the convention of the ‘explanation’ to foster an empowering, uncertain and open series of encounters. Across an installation featuring a new video work, weekly performances, detritus, found objects, philosophical texts and a selection of contemporary and historical artworks – including work by Merlin James, Conor Kelly, Julian Kildear, Tony Maas and David Teniers the Younger – Glasgow-based artist Rob Kennedy establishes an environment in which objects and spaces continually traverse different perceptual frameworks. At times being art, at times serving a function and at times provoking certain types of contemplation, the objects establish a series of correspondences and trajectories that resist being reducible to a single purpose.

Following a series of participatory events the approach and layout of the exhibition is informed by moments of exchange, unexpected dialogues and spontaneous relationships. Developing over the last two years with people from across the University community and beyond, acts of dis play has been opened up and transformed by the work of many other people whilst in turn bringing those people into different orbits and types of activity. Close collaboration between the artist and Talbot Rice Gallery has generated a mutual sense of change and discovery, leading both the artist and institution to work in new kinds of ways.

I’m interested in a dialogue about using the exhibition to encourage the experiential element of what it is to find yourself in an art gallery surrounded by objects, images and sounds. What does this stuff, in this room, in this institution, ‘do’ to the visitor?

Much of what I experience in contemporary art galleries does not seem to be essentially about these relationships, but about filtering the idea of experience through a series of coded instructions relating to historical and cultural frameworks. The point often seems to be to ‘get’ the work, to acknowledge the cultural signifiers within the work and mentally tick off from the accompanying requisite information sheet the list of subjects, references and ideas that the artist informs us is in the work. This for me results in more of an intellectual game that confronts the visitor with a series of problems, these can often only be solved with specific knowledge about how contemporary art circulates, what its norms of presentation are, how it can reflect the subjects it chooses to include.

Rob Kennedy 2016

Stephen Brandes : Parc du Souvenir

Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh
29 October – 17 December 2016

Parc du Souvenir comprises a new body of work by this Cork based artist that attempts to give form to both an interrelated and seemingly incongruous nebula of ideas and interests: from modern European history, Enlightenment philosophy, expressions of ideology in the rural and urban environment in the form of architecture and monuments, the Northern Romantic Landscape tradition, Dada and Constructivist collage, to the idea of affliction and wrongness as a relevant alternative aesthetic to classical notions of beauty.

The original impetus for this work came as a result of reading Cities in Evolution by the radical Scottish sociologist and city planner Patrick Geddes, closely followed by Gűnter Grass’s The Tin Drum.

The differences between these individuals could not be more profound. Geddes, very much symptomatic of the Victorian cultures of empire and philanthropy, though equally and conversely non-conformist, was drawn to the improvement of civic wellbeing through ideas born from a foundation in botanical study. Grass, adversely, witnessed the utter destruction of his bipartite birthplace, the Free City of Danzig, now Gdańsk, once a great and important Hanseatic port, part Polish, part Prussian, firstly under Nazism and later through Soviet invasion.

Geddes the scientist was also a dreamer drawn to mysticism. Grass the fabulist and satirist, a pragmatic socialist, instrumental in the reformation of German post-war politics. Both made remarkable achievements, and both suffered the consequences of historical circumstance at varying points in their lives.

There is no cohesive thesis to be sought here, no tidy packaging of contents. What is aimed for is a particular sentiment, one that sits between the endeavours of human ambition and its recurrent failures in a balanced mixture of poignancy and humour.

Neil Lebeter and Genevieve Warwick : Torrie Collection

For the first time in over a decade, the University of Edinburgh’s founding art collection has been brought back together to be exhibited in the Georgian interior of Gallery 2.

The Torrie Collection takes its name from Sir James Erskine, 3rd Baronet of Torrie, who bequeathed the remarkable works he had acquired to the University in 1836. Containing some of the finest Dutch painting and Renaissance sculpture in Scotland, the exhibition will include some exceptional artworks. Ruisdael’s Banks of a River is arguably the most important early painting by the artist anywhere in the world; de Vries’ Cain and Abel a unique piece for British collections; and the Anatomical Figure of a Horse is a stunning insight into the quest of Renaissance artists to develop the understanding of anatomy.

The Collection represents the Grand Tour tradition of collecting and the democratic principle of gifting art to the Nation, part of the great nineteenth-century expansion of both museums and universities across Britain. The terms of the Torrie gift stipulated that these works of art be made available to the general public for the express purpose of, “laying the foundation of a gallery for the encouragement of the Fine Arts.”Also a founding collection for the National Gallery of Scotland when it opened in 1859, its story is an integral part of Scotland’s national heritage.

Ongoing from 29 October, Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh

Devin Karambelas : Context is Half the Work. A Partial History of the APG

4 August – 31st October
Lower Church Gallery, Summerhall

A profile of the exhibition as realised at Summerhall researched and presented by Devin Karambelas.

This APG exhibition was curated by Naomi Hennig and Ulrike Jordan in dialogue with Barbara Steveni. Artists involved include Ian Breakwell, Roger Coward, Garth Evans, David Hall, John Latham, George Levantis and Barbara Steveni and others.

The Artist Placement Group (APG) was founded in the UK in 1966. The group initiated and organised placements for artists within industry and public institutions where they would research, develop ideas and projects in-situ. According to the APG principle, artistic practices and knowledge no longer needed to be confined to the studio, but the reach of the artist could extend to commercial, industrial and government contexts in order to contribute to social and organisational processes at all levels.

Context is Half the Work. A Partial History of the Artist Placement Group explores seven paradigmatic APG placements; it includes research material, video works, art works and documentation of the group’s activity, raising questions still relevant for present day context-based artistic practices. These include sculptor Garth Evans’ two-year fellowship at the British Steel Corporation (1969-70), David Hall’s TV Interruptions, broadcast on Scottish Television in 1971, George Levantis’ journeys on the container cargo ships of Ocean Fleets Ltd (1974-75), Roger Coward’s placement with the Department of the Environment (1975) where he worked with inhabitants of a Birmingham neighbourhood, and John Latham’s association with the Scottish Office (1975-76). Negotiations with the UK Department for Health and Social Security (DHSS) led to two placements for Ian Breakwell, and other artists associated with the APG. The first took place within a psychiatric hospital (1976) and the second was an interdisciplinary APG/DHSS research project which led to the development of an audio-visual therapy method for dementia-afflicted patients (1978-79). In addition, a selection of Barbara Steveni’s contextualizing video walks and interviews with women protagonists of the time will be shown.

The acclaimed exhibition curated by Naomi Hennig and Ulrike Jordan in dialogue with APG co-founder Barbara Steveni debuted at Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien, Berlin in 2015 (12 September – 8 November). The second iteration of the exhibition staged at Summerhall is the first Scottish exhibition giving an overview of this seminal group and related works, and is reworked in order to highlight the APG projects that took place in Scotland.Curated by Naomi Hennig and Ulrike Jordan in dialogue with Barbara Steveni. Artists include Ian Breakwell, Roger Coward, Garth Evans, David Hall, John Latham, George Levantis and Barbara Steveni and others.

The Artist Placement Group (APG) was founded in the UK in 1966. The group initiated and organised placements for artists within industry and public institutions where they would research, develop ideas and projects in-situ. According to the APG principle, artistic practices and knowledge no longer needed to be confined to the studio, but the reach of the artist could extend to commercial, industrial and government contexts in order to contribute to social and organisational processes at all levels.

Context is Half the Work. A Partial History of the Artist Placement Group explores seven paradigmatic APG placements; it includes research material, video works, art works and documentation of the group’s activity, raising questions still relevant for present day context-based artistic practices. These include sculptor Garth Evans’ two-year fellowship at the British Steel Corporation (1969-70), David Hall’s TV Interruptions, broadcast on Scottish Television in 1971, George Levantis’ journeys on the container cargo ships of Ocean Fleets Ltd (1974-75), Roger Coward’s placement with the Department of the Environment (1975) where he worked with inhabitants of a Birmingham neighbourhood, and John Latham’s association with the Scottish Office (1975-76). Negotiations with the UK Department for Health and Social Security (DHSS) led to two placements for Ian Breakwell, and other artists associated with the APG. The first took place within a psychiatric hospital (1976) and the second was an interdisciplinary APG/DHSS research project which led to the development of an audio-visual therapy method for dementia-afflicted patients (1978-79). In addition, a selection of Barbara Steveni’s contextualising video walks and interviews with women protagonists of the time will be shown.

This exhibition debuted at Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien, Berlin in 2015 (12 September – 8 November). The second iteration of the exhibition staged at Summerhall is the first Scottish exhibition providing an overview of this seminal group and related works and was reworked to highlight the APG projects that took place in Scotland.

Paul Nesbitt : 30 years of exhibitions at Inverleith House

Inverleith House was designed in 1773 by David Henderson and built for Sir James Rocheid (1715-1787) as his family home and centre piece of his estate in 1774 at a total cost of £4,109. Around 1820 a part of the Inverleith estate was sold to become the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). The house was gifted to the Crown in 1877 together with the surrounding land for the purpose of extending the activities of RBGE and for the enjoyment of the public. After restoration work following a fire, Inverleith House became the official residence of the Regius Keeper (director) of RBGE. From 1960 it housed the new Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, which in 1984 moved to the building of the former John Watson’s Institution in west Edinburgh. On 4 December 1970 the house was listed as a historic building. Since 1986 Inverleith House has been used as an exhibition space by RBGE.

Inverleith House is currently closed to the public.

Kate Gray : Collective Gallery Vision

In 2017 the A-listed City Observatory complex on Calton Hill will open freely to the public for the first time in its history. In partnership with the City of Edinburgh Council, Collective will save the site, which is on the Buildings at Risk Register and become custodians of this important piece of our nation’s heritage. The Observatory complex will become a world-class contemporary visual arts space, commissioning important new work by local and international practitioners.

Historically the City Observatory complex was a place to house telescopes and observe the stars, but observatories are also places to view, to reflect upon a city, to bring people together; laboratories to research and places to follow academic pursuits. Collective are developing a new kind of City Observatory for Edinburgh, encouraging engagement, connecting with the locality through the acts of looking, thinking and importantly producing in relation to the historic culture of the site.

Hallie Siegel : The Rust Garden

Exhibiting artists Matt Donovan and Hallie Siegel talk about the new work in their exhibition, and the themes that inspire their wider artistic practice. This launch reception celebrates Donovan & Siegel’s ambitious, organic and highly visible new artwork Rust Garden, commissioned by Edinburgh Printmakers for the building of Castle Mill Works. This artwork will monumentalise the heritage of Castle Mill Works and Fountainbridge’s industrial past.

Created in conjunction with the exhibition ‘History Machines’ by Donovan & Siegel at Edinburgh Printmakers

Location: Castle Mill Works, former North British Rubber Company HQ, Gilmore Park, Fountainbridge, EH11 1AL

Temporary installation lasting until 28th August 2016.

Matt Donovan and Hallie Siegel : History Machines

29 July – 22 October 2016

Location: Edinburgh Printmakers, 23 Union Street, Edinburgh, EH1 3LR, Scotland, UK
A UK premiere exhibition of new commissions and existing artwork by Toronto artists Matt Donovan and Hallie Siegel, that explores the enduring legacy of print that continues to shape how we communicate – even as we launch ourselves into a digital future.The new commissions in this exhibition are playful graphic hybrids that encourage us to look at ‘ print’ as not merely a series of technical processes and products, but as a graphic culture that exerts its influence over even our most mundane interactions and activities. Accompanying these prints, is a selection of other print-inspired work, which merges sculpture, graphic design, poetry, found text, and storytelling, to produce curious hybrid devices that embody the culture of printmaking. Examples include the Haikube, a poetry generation machine modelled on the Rubik’ s cube, and a machined brass Self-Printing Book – the ‘ sculptural edition’ of Vannevar Bush’ s 1945 essay “As We May Think”, commonly cited as a harbinger of the digital era and the first printed description of what we now know as personal computers, hypertext and the internet.

Sorcha Carey : Edinburgh Art Fest 2016

Founded in 2004, Edinburgh Art Festival is the UK’s largest annual festival of visual art. We bring together the capital’s leading galleries, museums and artist-run spaces, alongside new public art commissions by established and emerging artists and an innovative programme of special events. The vast majority of the festival is free to attend. About

Edinburgh Art Festival is a unique celebration of the visual arts, delivered in partnership with the city’s leading galleries, museums and artist-run spaces. Over the past ten years the Art Festival has grown to become the UK’s largest annual festival of visual art, recording nearly 300,000 attendances at over 40 exhibitions and 20 venues throughout August 2015. The Art Festival engages new audiences with the visual arts, supports artists to deliver ambitious projects and fosters rich debate amongst local communities about culture and heritage in our city.

Pat Fisher : Alice Neel, The Subject and Me

The Subject and Me tells the story of the turbulent events that shaped Alice Neel’s life, through a retrospective of drawings and selection of late paintings. Emphasising the psychological perception that would allow Neel (1900-1984) to produce some of the most striking and resonant portraits of the twentieth century, the exhibition offers candid observations of sexuality, family, childhood, pain and poverty. It is also an important subjective document of life in post-war America.

Associating with Andy Warhol and the Beat Generation, Neel tended to exist on the peripheries of society. Now seen from a contemporary perspective, when human interaction becomes increasingly mediated, her work seems able to be able to open up a direct and accessible conversation about what happens when one person encounters another. Against a tendency in much of the celebrated art of the last century, to remove the messiness of human existence, Neel’s work seems to strive for a more embracing world-view. To borrow from one of Neel’s close friends, poet Kenneth Fearing, the portraits seem to say: “I forgive you, to put it simply, for being alive, and pardon you, in short, for being you”.

The University of Edinburgh’s Talbot Rice Gallery is delighted to present The Subject and Me, the first solo exhibition Alice Neel in Scotland. It constitutes the latest in a series promoting the work of leading women artists, previously including Jane and Louise Wilson, Hanne Darboven, Jenny Holzer and Rosemarie Trockel.

29 July – 8 October 2016, Talbot Rice Gallery

Jess Johnson and Simon Ward : Eclectrc Panoptic

Eclectrc Panoptic teases back layers of cognition, reflecting New Zealand born artist Johnson’s interest in science fiction, alternative universes and the slippery nature of perception and reality.

Comprised of a suite of drawings, tessellating patterns and virtual reality technology, the exhibition becomes a bridging portal into another realm. The installation takes its genesis from the psychomagic group rituals conceived by the visionary filmmaker and comic book writer Alejandro Jodorowsky; and the technological themes of Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel ‘Dune’. Concealed within the space is ‘Ixian Gate’, a virtual reality artwork that can only be experienced through an Oculus Rift headset, plunging participants into the dystopic world of her drawings.

29 July – 8 October 2016, Talbot Rice Gallery

Jeffrey Hoffman and Charles Jencks : Astrophysicist & Astronaut, Artist & Architect

A’ the Airts, the Crawick Multiverse and MERZ Gallery in Sanquhar recently hosted a conversation between Jeffrey Hoffman and Charles Jencks as part of the MERZ exhibition ‘Landscape of the Waves’, featuring the work of Alex Rigg and Charles Jencks and developments at the Crawick Multiverse.

Jeffrey Hoffman made five flights as a space shuttle astronaut, including the first mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope in 1993, when the orbiting telescope’s flawed optical system was corrected. Trained as an astrophysicist, he also flew on 1990 Spacelab shuttle mission that featured the ASTRO-1 ultraviolet astronomical observatory in the shuttle’s payload bay. Over the course of his five missions he logged more than 1,211 hours and 21.5 million miles in space.

Charles Jencks is an American architecture theorist and critic, landscape architect and designer. His books on the history and criticism of modernism and postmodernism are widely read in architectural circles. He studied under the influential architectural historians Sigfried Giedion and Reyner Banham. Jencks lives in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland where he designs landscape sculpture.

An interview with Charles Jencks and Alex Rigg can be found at vimeo.com/172419807. A clip on the work of A’ the Airts to develop the famous Sanquhar knitwear can be found at vimeo.com/147865394.

The MERZ exhibition runs to 3rd September while Crawick Multiverse and A’ the Airts are open year-round.

Charles Jencks and Alex Rigg : Landscape of Waves

MERZ Gallery, Sanquhar, is putting on an exhibit of the artwork of Charles Jencks and Alex Rigg, in conjunction with the Summer Solstice Festival at the The Crawick Multiverse, the weekend of June 24-26th. Exhibition open 24 June – 3 September 2016

The exhibition features the idea that wave-forms permeate all of nature and the cosmos. Not only do they underlie water waves and brain waves, but also they are behind the twists and folds of the landscape, both natural and artificial patterns.

Scientists tell us that everything in the universe is both a wave and a particle, so it is no surprise that we see this truth in all of nature and at all scales. In this exhibit, Jencks will be showing painting and sculpture that reveal how the landscape and skyscape are actually made up of waveforms. These travelling waves underlie everything we see, especially the full electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma waves to radio waves. And Jet Stream waves organise into strange attractors that direct weather patterns of rain, wind and temperature that swirl around us every day. Alex Rigg and his company Oceanallover perform to, at, in, on, around, over such landscapes, both natural and man-made.

These performances are presented as a series of journeys or cycles that play with themes and variations of themes. The over-arching subject for all of these journeys is the persistence, resilience and intensity of life. For this exhibition Charles Jencks and Alex Rigg make a joint presentation of their work, with a particular emphasis on their collaborative work for the Crawick Multiverse site. The points of inspiration for this collaborative discussion are Solar Flare-Earth Shield and Coal as Petrified Sunlight – the Vortex of Energy.

More information at A’ the Airts, Sanquhar

Keith Hartley : Surreal Encounters

Surreal Encounters: Collecting the Marvellous brings together some of the finest Surrealist works of art from four legendary collections, those of Roland Penrose, Edward James, Gabrielle Keiller and Ulla and Heiner Pietzsch.

The ways that Surrealist art has been collected display many of the idiosyncratic passions of Surrealism itself. This exhibition will examine the different impulses behind these four extraordinary collections presenting a fuller and richer picture of the Surrealist movement as a whole.

Highlights include works such as, Mae West Lips Sofa, 1938 and Lobster telephone by Dalí, Magritte’s La reproduction interdite, 1937, Leonor Fini’s Due Donne, 1939 and Dorothea Tanning’s Eine Kleine Nachtmusik 1943.

The exhibition is jointly organised by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, the Hamburger Kunsthalle and Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. From 4th June until 11th September 2016 in Edinburgh.

James Clegg : Interim

Interim is an exhibition at the University of Edinburgh’s Talbot Rice Gallery, featuring work by first year students from the MFA/MA Contemporary Art Practice course at Edinburgh College of Art. Realised through a dialogue between students and gallery curators, it provides an overview of postgraduate studio practice as it is being developed.